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9 Best Beer Glassware

Listen, there is nothing wrong with drinking beer from a bottle or can, but trust me when I say that same beer will taste SO much better in a glass. Don't believe me? Try it. Go ahead, pour that beer right down the barrel of a pint. Don't worry, I can wait...


What's that? YOU DON'T OWN A BEER GLASS!?!?!


Well, my friend, you're in luck, because we at Friends Drink Beer have tried hundreds of beers in a variety of different beer glasses, and I promise there is a beer glass out there for you.


But what style of beer glass to invest in? There's so many out there, and unless you're a beer geek like myself, there's no need to fill your cabinets with every single style (though they do look nice on your shelves). So, allow me to walk you through my own little virtual Beer Pint Bazaar, where one of these nine styles is bound to fit your personal favorite type of brew.


The English Tulip Pint is a classic pint glass you've properly seen many times over, especially when it comes to Guinness. This style has definitely found a home with Irish stouts, and is, in my opinion, the second-best all-around pint glass to use. The narrow base is easy to hold and reduces heat transfer from hand to beer, and that slight inward taper at the rim helps to capture the aroma, as well as concentrate the foam, resulting in a denser, creamier head. Wait, what's the BEST all-around pint glass? Patience, my friend. Patience.


The name "No-nick" refers to the bulge that keeps the rim from nicking when bumped together. It's been used for English Ales since the early 1960s, and is great for low-gravity session beers. What's a low-gravity session beer? Great question. Low-gravity essentially equates to low ABV, and a session beer is a brew designed to be lighter, that doesn't over tax the drinkers palate; something you can have many of in one "session" of drinking. So, a low-gravity session beer basically means a lighter beer, something below 4.5% ABV such as British bitters, witbiers, and American mass-market lagers such as Budweiser or Miller.


The Willi Glass is one of the simpler designs that can often be found in various craft brew pubs. The in-curved rim helps trap the brew's aroma, and is great for lagers, both light and dark.









If you've ever seen someone drinking beer from a brandy glass like this and wondered, "What type of fancy beer are they drinking?" let me tell you it was something strong. Most likely a barley wine or imperial stout. In fact, any style of beer labeled as "imperial" would most likely be appropriate for a snifter. They usually range anywhere from 8% to 10.5% ABV or beyond, and should be safely enjoyed in smaller glassware.




The Stemmed Tulip, otherwise known as a Libbey Glass, is in my humble opinion, the best over-all beer glass out there. Think of it as the snooty older brother to the English tulip, who just entered college and discovered things like philosophy and french press coffee. Much like the English Tulip, the Libbey's inward taper holds aroma, however, the Libbey then continues with an outward flare that supports the head and comfortably fits the lips. If you're a true beer snob, with tastes that range from Belgian ales, to IPAs, to porters, this may be the glass for you.





Though this glass works great for any pale, bright beer, the Tapered Pilsner Glass is particularly perfect for, you guessed it, Pilsners. The narrow shape of the glass helps show off the beer's pale color, the outward taper supports the head of the brew, and the footed base adds a bit of class, as well as overall stability. If you're one to go against the grain and prefer Pilsner's to IPAs, this is your glass my friend.








A Weissbier Vase is your most classic hefeweizen glass and is truly the best way to enjoy one. The large size of the glass (usually around 24oz.) is designed to hold that thick layer of foam, which the inward taper concentrates for a beautiful beer head. This glass would be great for essentially any wheat beer including Bavarian Dunkelweizen, Weizenbock, Weizen Doppelbock, and Berliner Weisse.








The English Dimpled Pint has been around since 1948 and is used primarily for mild ales and bitters. They're fairly comfortable to hold, and the lens design makes for a gorgeous play of light on an amber-colored beer.




The Bavarian Seidel is your quintessential Oktoberfest stein. Known as a big glass for small beers, it can suit any light, low ABV, pale brew including Pilsners and helles.







Find one that suits you? Great! Now, that you have your glass pour that brew boldly down the center.


What are you doing? Don't tilt the glass! You're not a bartender being harped on by impatient patrons. You're at home enjoying a beer after a long, hard day. You deserve the best! So, let that beer foam up. Then, watch as it settles, and repeat until that glass is finally, wonderfully full. Look at that dense, creamy foam. Smell those beautiful aromatics. Watch as those tiny bubbles dance upward to meet that white, billowing head. Taste the smooth creaminess of what you just poured. Is this is a draft beer? No! This is your beer. Enjoy it, my friend. Enjoy.


If you are like myself, and love having a beer glass for any occasion, you can find an affordable set of them here. This set includes a No-nick Pint, Willi glass, Stemmed Tulip, Tapered Pilsner glass, Weissbeer Vase, amongst others, for only $29.99.


While your enjoying your delicious brew, be sure to listen to Friends Drink Beer! A podcast where we try a new beer each week, and allow you, the listener, to join us for a conversation among friends. Available on Apple iTunes and anywhere fine podcasts are downloaded.


Cheers,

Ryan


Want more info about beer glassware or just plain beer knowledge? Check out Tasting Beer by Randy Mosher. Randy is not only a beer expert, but has also been a guest on the show! It's a fantastic read for anyone looking to expand there knowledge on the world's greatest drink.


Looking to start your own podcast? Check out our blog, Best Podcast Equipment 2021, where Alex, co-host and local tech head, goes over all the gear we use for the show!


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